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 Designing for a sustainability workshop Credit: Andrew Brodhead

Core Principle: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

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This is critical to the promise of democratic culture in higher education and to the opportunity for transformational change for student learning (AAC&U, 2015). Furthermore, this principle helps diminish the stereotype of the “Stanford student” or “Stanford culture” that may harm historically underserved communities on our campus (McNair, Bensimon, Piqueux, 2020). This value was added in 2021. The ResX task force believes that diversity and inclusion are embedded in each of the core values below. Diversity, equity, and inclusion are essential to the ResX vision, which is why we made this a fourth core value.

Neighborhood Decorative Accent Line

Executive Summary

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion are critical to the well-being of democratic culture in higher education and lead to transformational change for student learning (AAC&U, 2015).  With this additional principle, strategic alignment and leveraging resources to advance equity goals ensures that the driving principles of health and well-being, belonging and community and intellectual and personal growth are inclusive of all students in the neighborhood communities.  Furthermore, this additional principle helps diminish the predominance of the universal notion of the “Stanford student” or “Stanford culture,” which thereby may further harm or worsen disparities among historically underserved communities in building this new residential experience (McNair, Bensimon, Piqueux, 2020).   

Rationale

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion are critical to the well-being of democratic culture in higher education and lead to transformational change for student learning (AAC&U, 2015).  The creation of an inclusive community calls for 

  • Diversity -- individual and intersectional differences in identities and abilities, along with group and social differences, 
  • Inclusion - active, intentional and ongoing engagement in living communities in ways that increase awareness and self-knowledge, content knowledge, metacognitive development, social development and empathetic understanding of the complex ways individuals interact within systems and institutions, and,
  • Equity - the creation of opportunities for historically underserved and minoritized communities have equal access to and participate fully in educational opportunities and engagement (AAC&U, 2015).

With this additional principle, strategic alignment and leveraging resources to advance equity goals ensures that the driving principles of health and well-being, belonging and community and intellectual and personal growth are inclusive of all students in the neighborhood communities.  Furthermore, this additional principle helps diminish the predominance of the universal notion of the “Stanford student” or “Stanford culture,” which thereby may further harm or worsen disparities among historically underserved communities in building this new residential experience (McNair, Bensimon, Malcolm-Piqueux, 2020).